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SitP: Vitamin K Refusal with Clay Jones [caption id="attachment_2078" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Newborn receiving a vitamin K shot[/caption] The Boston Skeptics are lucky to have members like Clay Jones, pediatrician and Science Based...

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Darwin Day Brunch WEATHER UPDATE: Due to the impending 4th Blizzard, Darwin Day has been postponed one week, to Feb. 22. Thursday, Feb 12 is Charles Darwin's 206th birthday. We're celebrating with noodles and dinosaurs. Join...

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Darwin Day Brunch WEATHER UPDATE: Due to the impending 4th Blizzard, Darwin Day has been postponed one week, to Feb. 22. Thursday, Feb 12 is Charles Darwin's 206th birthday. We're celebrating with noodles and dinosaurs. Join...

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Getting Invited! [caption id="attachment_2039" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Our Friend Charles Beagleson with a Tortoise and Finches[/caption] Facebook no longer automatically invites all members of a group to group...

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SitP: Vitamin K Refusal with Clay Jones

Posted on : Feb-26-2015 | By : John | In : Blog Post, Event, Skeptics in the Pub

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Newborn receiving a vitamin K shot

Newborn receiving a vitamin K shot


The Boston Skeptics are lucky to have members like Clay Jones, pediatrician and Science Based Medicine blogger. Clay will be joining us on Monday, March 2 for our next Skeptics in the Pub, to discuss yet another case of people ignoring the best scientific evidence for a medical treatment, to the detriment of their children. Tragically, several children have recently died and many more have suffered serious brain injury from internal bleeding that can easily be prevented by a vitamin K injection shortly after birth.

As Clay ably explains in a post on SBM, most or all newborns suffer from vitamin K deficiency. This is due to a variety of causes, ranging from an immature digestive system that can’t readily absorb vitamin K, an immature liver that doesn’t process vitamin K efficiently, lack of gut bacteria that help digest foods and release the vitamin K in them, and the low levels of vitamin K in human breast milk. (Infant formula is fortified with vitamin K, so deficiency is less a problem but not eliminated in formula-fed babies.) The first three causes are significantly worse in premature babies.

Vitamin K is essential to several processes involved in forming blood clots, and people with vitamin K deficiency are much more likely to suffer from bruising and bleeding, both external and internal. Early vitamin K-deficient bleeding (VKDB) occurs in the first week after birth. It is fairly common, about 1.7% of all babies experience it (or would if vitamin K injections weren’t SOP since 1961), usually in the form of bleeding under the skin or (more scarily) under the membrane that covers bones. The latter can result in disturbing lumps on the skull and terrified parents, but usually resolves itself fairly quickly. Much more serious, but much rarer, is late VKDB, which occurs between 2 and 12 weeks. This can result in serious internal bleeding into the gut and the brain. Brain bleeds can cause serious brain injuries or even death. Babies not given vitamin K suffer late VKDB at the rate of about 4.4 to 7.2 per 100,000 children, 20% of them die and half the remainder suffer long term problems. Before vitamin K treatment became routine, VKDB was an important cause of infant mortality.

Fortunately, both forms of VKDB can be virtually completely eliminated by a simple, single intramuscular vitamin K injection

Vitamin K being administered to a newborn

Vitamin K being administered to a newborn

within a few hours of birth. Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin, and is retained in the babies muscle and slowly released for several months, long enough for the baby’s digestive system and internal organs to mature sufficiently to process vitamin K from food on their own. Oral vitamin K also works, but not quite as well, and requires daily or weekly doses of liquid vitamin K over several weeks or months, and it is difficult for harried parents to stick to the schedule. Oral vitamin K is standard treatment in some countries, but many of them are switching to (or switching back to) injections.

Increasingly, and frighteningly, more parents are refusing consent for their babies to receive the injection. This seems to be correlated with the anti-vax movement, though their objections are much more tenuous. Similar to the bogus autism-vaccine link espoused by Andrew Wakefield and others, there was a tiny, poorly done study (since thoroughly refuted) that claimed to link vitamin K to childhood leukemia. The anti-K movement lacks the prominent purveyors of nonsense that keeps the anti-vax movement alive. (Even Dr. Joeseph Mercola doesn’t believe vitamin K shots cause leukemia, but he does prefer oral doses, of course.) Clay will tell us, we hope, about other motivations parents have for refusing the vitamin K jab.

The problem of vitamin K rejection is receiving increased media attention. Chris Mooney wrote about it last summer in his Mother Jones blog, and Mooney and Indre Viskontas interviewed Clay about it on the Inquiring Minds podcast. (Interview starts about 6 minutes in.)

We will be meeting at 7PM on Monday, March 2, 2015 in the back room at The Burren, 247 Elm St. in Davis Square, Somerville. Please RSVP* on our Facebook event page. If enough people say they will attend in advance, the Burren will provide us with our own wait staff and/or bartender, which will avoid a crush of people trying to get food or drinks. Also, it might be a good idea to arrive a little early if you possibly can.

Hopefully, we won’t have yet another blizzard!

[*] Yes, I know “Please RSVP” is redundant.

Darwin Day Brunch

Posted on : Feb-09-2015 | By : John | In : Event, local

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WEATHER UPDATE: Due to the impending 4th Blizzard, Darwin Day has been postponed one week, to Feb. 22.

Thursday, Feb 12 is Charles Darwin’s 206th birthday. The Birthday Boy

We’re celebrating with Oodles of Noodlesnoodles and Modern Dinosaurs dinosaurs.

Join us at 11 AM Sunday, Feb 15 Feb 22 at Santouka Ramen in Harvard Square for brunch, followed by a The Voyage of HMS Beaglevoyage† to the Hominids at the Museum of Natural History Harvard Museum of Natural History.

RSVP on our Facebook event page.

Date: Sunday, Feb 15 Feb 22, 2015
Brunch Time: 11 AM
Place: Santouka Ramen
1 Bow Street
Cambridge MA

Museum Time: 1 PM
Place: Harvard Museum of Natural History
26 Oxford Street
Cambridge MA

[†] Boat not provided‡.
[‡] Boat not needed, since it’s just a 10 minute walk, not a 5 year circumnavigation. Spaceship not needed either.

Getting Invited!

Posted on : Jan-29-2015 | By : John | In : Blog Post

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Chuck

Our Friend Charles Beagleson with a Tortoise and Finches


Facebook no longer automatically invites all members of a group to group events, if the group has more than 250 members. The Boston Skeptics group currently has 557 members, so most of you aren’t getting notified of events unless you check the page (or here) frequently.

But Facebook members can invite their friends! Go to the event page, click on Invite, pick Choose Friends on the menu, and then an Invite window will pop up with a list of suggestions on the left side. Pick Boston Skeptics under MY GROUPS (you might have to scroll down) and a list of your friends who are members of the Boston Skeptics will appear in the middle column. Click on Select All at the top and all your Skeptical Friends will get selected (except those who have already been invited by someone else, so they won’t get spammed.) Of course, you can also invite people who aren’t members, since all (AFIAK) our events are public!

There’s more! We’ve invented a Facebook user, Charles Beagleson, who is a friend to everyone. (At least, to everyone who has accepted a friend request from him.) Charlie will probably be sending you a friend request soon, or you can send him one. Chuck will be sending invites to all his friends for all future events. (If you don’t want to be inundated by the average of 2 events per month, just don’t accept his friendship, or unfriend him if you’ve already accepted. He won’t be insulted. ;-(

SitP: Invisible Threat

Posted on : Jan-25-2015 | By : John | In : Event, movie, Skeptics in the Pub

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Re-opening announcement

Grand Re-re-re-opening


Good News, everybody! We have a new home for Skeptics in the Pub. Our first event will be watching a DVD about the immune system, the threat of communicable diseases, how vaccines work, why some people choose not to vaccinate, and what the public health consequences of that choice are.

Invisible Threat is a 40-minute documentary made by a group of students at the Carlsbad High School in Southern California. Judging by the trailer and reviews (and the anti-vax reactions to it), it is very well done and informative. Their scientific technical adviser was Dr. Paul Offit, pediatrician and vaccine developer at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and author of several books about vaccines, alternative medicine.

Before the video was released, and unseen by its critics, the students making it received bullying and threats from the anti-vax and conspiracy theory communities. Some of the teachers and adult advisers wanted to pull out of the project, but fortunately for us, the students persevered. Still the intimidation continued and anti-vax propaganda was aired unchallenged on a Teach the Controversy report on local TV.

Following the film, we will have a discussion led by some members of our group with an interest in and knowledge of vaccines, communicable diseases and autism.

Our new location is The Burren, located at 247 Elm Street in Davis Square, Somerville. We will be meeting in the back room at 7PM on the first Monday of every month. If you want to familiarize yourself with the Burren, please come to our Getting Acquainted event on Monday January 26.

You can RSVP on Facebook. The Burren wants a preliminary estimate of attendance so they can decide whether to assign a bartender and/or wait staff to the back room for that night. It would make it easier, quicker and less disruptive for us to get food and drinks if they do, so please sign up ASAP if you are planning to attend. (But if you aren’t sure or don’t sign up, no worries. There is plenty of room, and we want to see you again.)

Summary:

  • When: February 2, 2015 at 7:00 PM
  • Where: The Burren, 247 Elm St, Davis Square, Somerville
  • What: Invisible Threat video and discussion

  • (The official starting time is 7PM, but if people arrive early, they can order dinner and/or drinks. The Burren said they could open up the room to us earlier than 7 if there is demand.)

    SitP: Getting Acquainted with the Burren

    Posted on : Jan-22-2015 | By : John | In : Event, Skeptics in the Pub

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    We are having one final “Last Monday” Skeptics in the Pub, next Monday, January 26, at the Burren in Davis Square, Somerville.

    There is no formal program.

    Please come if you would like to meet folks, check out the menu and beer list, practice urban navigation skills, or help us organize, pick speakers, or just rant on your favorite skeptical topic.

    This is a prequel to the Big News: We have a new home for Boston Skeptics Skeptics in the Pub! Starting Monday, February 2, 2015, and the first (no longer last) Monday of every month thereafter, we will be meeting in the back room of the Burren for our regular monthly program of speakers, writers, musicians, magicians, movies, trivia contests, or whatever strikes our fancy! (By attending this Monday, you can help us decide future events and speakers.)

    If you’re like me and like to lurk investigate a bit before joining in some activity, this is a perfect opportunity. We promise not to force you to participate in any organizational activities unless you want to.

    We will be meeting at 7 PM at the Burren in Davis Sq, Somerville on Monday, January 26.

    The Burren is located at 247 Elm Street, just a 2 minute walk from the Davis Square T stop. There is loads of parking in the area (the municipal lots seem to be free after 8 PM), though the streets are narrow and car-filled. Detailed directions are on the Burren’s map page.

    The Burren is an Irish pub with a strong focus on Irish, traditional American, folk and acoustic music as well as poetry slams and comedy. The Boston Science by the Pint group meets there on the second Monday of each month, so I think we’ll fit right in.

    Best of all, the event is FREE!

    Please RSVP on the event Facebook page. If enough people sign up in advance, the Burren will reserve us a table or area so we can all sit together.

    Book Club: “1491” by Charles C. Mann

    Posted on : Jan-20-2015 | By : John | In : Book Club

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    IMPORTANT UPDATE: We have postponed until Feb 7 due to bad weather.

    Political Map of Pre-invasion America

    America in 1491

    People have lived in the Americas for at least 13,000 years, more likely 20 or even 30,000 years according to the latest archeological evidence. Only the last 500 years, the last 2%, of this history is well known to modern Americans. There are many reasons for this. The native cultures, artifacts and written records were systematically destroyed by the people Kurt Vonnegut calls the Sea Pirates, who arrived here in force starting in 1492. In addition to cultural imperialism and instigating total war (in the 20th Century sense), in places like New England, they brought diseases, plagues of measles, smallpox, hepatitis and other diseases you’ve probably never heard of. The population was decimated, not literally, but figuratively, which is much worse. For example, in central Mexico, the population declined from 25.2 million to 700,000 (97%) between 1518 (when Cortes arrived) and 1623.

    Despite the destruction, some historical sources survived. Many of the Indian societies were literate, and even in places where most of the books were destroyed, stone monuments and buildings still exist. There are oral traditions of the survivors, early European records and written accounts by the children and grandchildren of the the survivors, and archeology, linguistic evidence, DNA evidence (both human and of domesticated plants and animals), epidemiology, patterns of trade and the spread of agriculture, and more. This book, 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus by by Charles C. Mann, explores all this evidence to fill a huge gap in the knowledge of most Americans of their own history, and dispels many myths.

    For example, the Americas were not sparsely populated before the Europeans arrived and some of the largest cities, road and trade networks in the world in the 15th century were in Central and South America, rivaling the largest in Europe and China at the time. There were vast engineering projects, ranging from mound building in the Midwest to water and irrigation projects in Central America and the Andes. Some of the projects were not so beneficial, but exhibit highly sophisticated organization, such as the when the Inkas forced migrations of thousands of people to achieve political ends.

    Charles C. Mann is not a former defensive lineman for (ironically) the Washington Redskins. He is a science writer and contributing editor for Science, The Atlantic Monthly and Wired.

    Please join us to discuss this book on Saturday, February 7 at 3 PM in our usual meeting place, Harvard’s Northwest Science Building, 52 Oxford Street, Cambridge. Bring your appetite and, if you wish, a snack to share. Also optional, you can RSVP on our Facebook event page. Remember, the first gratuitous Star Trek reference always receives a complimentary phaser blast. (Warning: I did remember to put new batteries in my phaser.)

    Mary will be leading an online discussion of the book the next day (January 25) at the Skepchick Book Club. Drop by and make all those insightful comments you forgot to make at the meeting, or if you live too far away to attend in person. (But it’s much more fun to be there!)

    SitP: Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of Other Pubs

    Posted on : Oct-15-2014 | By : John | In : Event, local, Skeptics in the Pub

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    Join us once again in our search for a new home. This month we are checking out Cambridge Common, on Mass Ave just north of Harvard Square.

    No special topic this month. But since it’s Halloween week, maybe we should bring ghost-hunting equipment and see if it’s haunted, like the pub in New York where NECSS has held their Drinking Skeptically on occasion. (There were very mysterious noises coming from the bathroom there, but surprisingly no one seemed keen to investigate.)

    We’ll be meeting at 7PM on Monday October 27, 2014. The address is 1667 Mass Ave, Cambridge. It’s about 4 blocks north of Harvard Sq, between Wendell and Sacramento Streets. (On the map, it looks just as close to Porter Square, and it might be easier to walk from there.) You can sign up on our Facebook event page to help us get an idea how many people might show up, though this does tend to tip off the fraudsters ghosts.

    P.S. If you have other pub suggestions, please post them on Facebook.

    Book Club: “What If?” by Randall Munroe

    Posted on : Oct-15-2014 | By : John | In : Book Club

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    XKCD cartoon depicting odds of surviving a lightning strike

    Scientific analysis of real-life problems

    Our next book is “What If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions by xkcd cartoonist Randall Munroe.

    Munroe supplies scientific, in many cases, mathematical answers to the deepest, darkest questions one can ask. Some are very unpleasant, such as what would happen if the Earth suddenly stopped rotating? (Scientists at the South Pole and people in coal mines would probably survive, for a while.) What would happen if you tried to hit a baseball thrown at .9 c? (Not good for either the batter or the pitcher, not to mention the catcher, umpire, ball park and the city.) What would happen if you gathered a mole of moles? (Not good for moles in the middle, since they would form a sphere larger than the Moon.) Some answers are surprisingly benign, such as could you survive swimming in a spent nuclear fuel pool? (You’d be fine, as long as you didn’t dive too deep or pick up any random objects lying at the bottom.) Or what would happen if everyone stood near each other and jumped at the same time? (Basically, nothing, because the Earth out-masses us by 12 orders of magnitude. Except we would take up an area the size of Rhode Island, and T F Green Airport would be overwhelmed for thousands of years as everyone tried to return home afterwards, and we’d mostly starve to death as the world plunged into chaos and anarchy.)

    Then there are the scary questions. They all seem to have the proviso that the person asking the question really, really needs to know the answer by Friday.

    The book is fun and quick to read, and is copiously illustrated with Munroe’s surprisingly evocative stick-figure drawings. I got the Kindle version, which seems to freak out my Kindle occasionally. (It’s rebooted at least 3 times, and has a few formatting problems, mostly connected with the footnotes. Paging forward and back seems to fix most of the issues.) I wish had purchased a hard-copy version, as it would make an ideal bathroom book.

    Please join us to discuss this book on Saturday, October 25 at 3 PM in our usual meeting place, Harvard’s Northwest Science Building, 52 Oxford Street, Cambridge. Bring your appetite and, if you wish, a snack to share. Also optional, you can RSVP on our Facebook event page. Remember, the first gratuitous Star Trek reference always receives a complimentary phaser blast. (Set to stun unless I remember to put new batteries in my phaser.)

    Mary will be leading an online discussion of the book the next day (October 26) at the Skepchick Book Club. Drop by and make all those insightful comments you forgot to make at the meeting, or if you live too far away to attend in person. (But it’s much more fun to be there!)

    Book Club: “Life Ascending” by Nick Lane

    Posted on : Aug-13-2014 | By : John | In : Book Club

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    This month we are reading Life Ascending: The Ten Great Inventions of Evolution by Nick Lane.

    Nick Lane is a Reader in Evolutionary Biochemistry at University College London. He has written books about oxygen, mitochondria and cryobiology. Our current book is organized into 10 chapters, each covering an important advance (“inventions”) in the history of life. It is one of the most “sciency” books we’ve read recently, with occasional vivid descriptions of, for example, the view of the Earth from the Moon first seen by the Apollo 8 astronauts in 1968, the early Earth before the first life emerged and both kinds of hydrothermal vents (I didn’t know there was more than one.) There is little in the way of personal anecdotes or historical discussions. For the most part, the book dives right into the science, and there is a lot of it!

    I’m finding it dense going but thoroughly worthwhile. A lot of it, especially the first chapter on the origins of life, is new to me. It also clears up a lot of common misconceptions, such as where the oxygen (O2) released by photosynthesis comes from. (It comes from splitting water molecules, not from reducing CO2. But it does convert atmospheric CO2 into solid carbohydrates, which is why plants are the ultimate solution to global warming.)

    SitP: Let’s Find a New Pub

    Posted on : Aug-09-2014 | By : John | In : Blog Post, local

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    Since Tommy Doyle’s closed we’ve been meeting very sporadically (except the Book Club). We need a new regular meeting place. I’ve put up a post on Facebook* where people can make suggestions.

    For people who don’t do Facebook, here’s a copy of the post. (You can email me suggestions or comments, or leave a comment here.)


    Hey, everybody! Let’s crowd-source a new meeting place.

    Since Tommy Doyle’s closed, we haven’t had a good meeting place. We had a couple of get-togethers at Meadhall in Kendall Sq, but it isn’t really set up for speakers, music or movies. Good beer, okay food, comfy chairs, but still lacking

    I think what we need is a place with:

    • room for about 60-80 people (with standing room for 20-30 more)
    • near a T station
    • accessible (I think this was a problem at Tommy Doyle’s)
    • a stage or other easily visible area for speakers and musicians
    • comfortable environment
    • good but not fancy food
    • decent bar
    • inexpensive enough that we don’t frighten away students and people on a limited income.
    • friendly and accepting staff
    • management that is amenable to reserving us a space on the expectation that there would be good business on an otherwise quiet evening
    • ability to record the talks (audio and video) if our guest wants us to (I think we can supply our own recording equipment and cameras if needed.)

    Any other requirements I missed? Did I get the size right?

    Does anyone know the perfect place or have any suggestions?

    Should we form an exploratory committee to perform a skeptical investigation (i.e. a pub crawl?)


    [*] I think that’s a link to the group rather than the specific post, but it should be easy to find since we don’t get a lot of posts…